Warren Zevon Was Right

    21 Sep 2014

    nprglobalhealth:

Some Airports Have A New Security Routine: Taking Your Temperature
Airports in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone are relying on a familiar tool to stop the spread of Ebola: the thermometer.
Airport staff are measuring the temperature of anyone trying to leave the country, looking for “unexplained febrile illness,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which is advising these countries on their exit screening processes.
Other countries that are far from the infected region are screening passengers arriving from West Africa or who have a history of travel to the region. Temperature takers include Russia, Australia and India.
Travelers who exhibit an elevated fever, generally over 101.4 degrees Fahrenheit (though it varies by country), are stopped for further screening. That could mean a questionnaire or medical tests.
Critics of exit screening have pointed out the flaws in using thermometers: fever can lay dormant for two to 21 days in someone who’s been infected with Ebola, and low-grade fevers can be lowered further by simple medications like Tylenol or Advil.
While they can’t predict symptoms before they emerge, the CDC is prepared to thwart those trying to mask a fever with a pill.
"Airline and airport staff are trained to do visual checks of anyone who looks even slightly ill," says Tai Chen, a quarantine medical officer from the CDC who returned from Liberia this past Tuesday. "And most airports are using multiple temperature checks, starting when you arrive on the airport grounds in your car until you get on the plane. Even if you take medication, your fever will likely have manifested by then."
Here’s the three methods that can be used at airports.
Photo: A Nepalese health worker uses a handheld infrared thermometer on a passenger arriving at Nepal’s only international airport in Kathmandu. (Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images)

    nprglobalhealth:

    Some Airports Have A New Security Routine: Taking Your Temperature

    Airports in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone are relying on a familiar tool to stop the spread of Ebola: the thermometer.

    Airport staff are measuring the temperature of anyone trying to leave the country, looking for “unexplained febrile illness,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which is advising these countries on their exit screening processes.

    Other countries that are far from the infected region are screening passengers arriving from West Africa or who have a history of travel to the region. Temperature takers include Russia, Australia and India.

    Travelers who exhibit an elevated fever, generally over 101.4 degrees Fahrenheit (though it varies by country), are stopped for further screening. That could mean a questionnaire or medical tests.

    Critics of exit screening have pointed out the flaws in using thermometers: fever can lay dormant for two to 21 days in someone who’s been infected with Ebola, and low-grade fevers can be lowered further by simple medications like Tylenol or Advil.

    While they can’t predict symptoms before they emerge, the CDC is prepared to thwart those trying to mask a fever with a pill.

    "Airline and airport staff are trained to do visual checks of anyone who looks even slightly ill," says Tai Chen, a quarantine medical officer from the CDC who returned from Liberia this past Tuesday. "And most airports are using multiple temperature checks, starting when you arrive on the airport grounds in your car until you get on the plane. Even if you take medication, your fever will likely have manifested by then."

    Here’s the three methods that can be used at airports.

    Photo: A Nepalese health worker uses a handheld infrared thermometer on a passenger arriving at Nepal’s only international airport in Kathmandu. (Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images)

    13 Sep 2014

    (Source: youtube.com)

    13 Sep 2014

    flowisaconstruct:

Is this a city ordinance? Or federal law?

    flowisaconstruct:

    Is this a city ordinance? Or federal law?

    13 Sep 2014

    (Source: youtube.com)

    13 Sep 2014

    13 Sep 2014

    11 Sep 2014

    11 Sep 2014

    huffpostcomedy:

    On September 17, David Letterman was the first comedian to return to the air. His opening monologue has been called ”one of the purest, most honest and important moments in TV history.” Toward the end of his remarks, he gave voice to the utter confusion many Americans felt: “We’re told they were zealots fueled by religious fervor. Religious fervor. And if you live to be a thousand years old, will that make any sense to you? Will that make any goddamn sense?” The full clip of Letterman’s opening remarks can be seen here and the full transcript is here.

    More: Laughter after 9/11: The moments that brought us back.

    8 Sep 2014

    8 Sep 2014

    “Ray Lewis: There is no comparison of me and Ray Rice. I’m far more similar to Aaron Hernandez.”